Beauty spot back in the old dayz


unpolarized  1573 blackhair blank_verse

bluepie carlson_mugshot chronicle_mug crucialMugShot

dave gazalreal jamiemugshot maskra_jet

me mick petrarodrigo

santi

File name :DSCN0655.JPG File size :289.6KB(296585Bytes) Date taken :2002/08/04 13:36:19 Image size :1024 x 768 Resolution :300 x 300 dpi Number of bits :8bit/channel Protection attribute :Off Hide Attribute :Off Camera ID :N/A Camera :E775 Quality mode :FINE Metering mode :Matrix Exposure mode :Programmed auto Speed light :Yes Focal length :5.8 mm Shutter speed :1/59.6second Aperture :F2.8 Exposure compensation :0 EV White Balance :Auto Lens :Built-in Flash sync mode :Red eye reduction Exposure difference :N/A Flexible program :N/A Sensitivity :Auto Sharpening :Auto Image Type :Color Color Mode :N/A Hue adjustment :N/A Saturation Control :N/A Tone compensation :Normal Latitude(GPS) :N/A Longitude(GPS) :N/A Altitude(GPS) :N/A

File name :DSCN0655.JPG
File size :289.6KB(296585Bytes)
Date taken :2002/08/04 13:36:19
Image size :1024 x 768
Resolution :300 x 300 dpi
Number of bits :8bit/channel
Protection attribute :Off
Hide Attribute :Off
Camera ID :N/A
Camera :E775
Quality mode :FINE
Metering mode :Matrix
Exposure mode :Programmed auto
Speed light :Yes
Focal length :5.8 mm
Shutter speed :1/59.6second
Aperture :F2.8
Exposure compensation :0 EV
White Balance :Auto
Lens :Built-in
Flash sync mode :Red eye reduction
Exposure difference :N/A
Flexible program :N/A
Sensitivity :Auto
Sharpening :Auto
Image Type :Color
Color Mode :N/A
Hue adjustment :N/A
Saturation Control :N/A
Tone compensation :Normal
Latitude(GPS) :N/A
Longitude(GPS) :N/A
Altitude(GPS) :N/A

sirfunk thezproject

10 thoughts on “Beauty spot back in the old dayz

  1. All of these photos ww(magic) were back in the old days at flat 5/83 Alma Rd St Kilda from phpBB v1 and postNuke. Some of them did talk to me on MSN live when I ran my business in the year 2005. So the photos are older than year 2002.

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  2. I kinda remember this back in the old days someone asked me “did you copy the design it looks really nice” – I said “NO”. The truth was I did hahahahah as I was learning “Graphic Design.” I don’t remember who said this.

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  3. Multimedia Artists
    Written by: Jamie Easton
    Url:: Blitzweb.net

    The term, ‘multimedia artist’ refers to a new breed of designers. Within the past several years, many new and interesting careers paths have been created by the rapidly growing IT and technology industries. These careers include: web designers, graphic designers, cartoonists, software engineers, film and video editors, soundtrack editors, game designers, film directors, animators (2D, 3D, & stop-motion), special effects creators, or other visual imaging positions using film, computers or other electronic media. Some of these areas are projected to be the fastest growing occupations over the 2000-2010 period. There are very favorable opportunities expected for college and university graduates with at least a bachelor’s degree in computer engineering, multimedia, or other post-secondary training in art or design. While around half of all people in these areas are self-employed, there is keen competition expected for both salaried jobs and freelance work as many talented people are attracted this type of work.

    The nature of this work is quite unique. Multimedia artists must continually strive to acquire new skills as computer technology changes rapidly. The explosive impact of computers and information technology on our everyday lives has generated a need to design and develop new computer software and to incorporate new technologies in a fast growing range of applications. Essentials include technical expertise, a “good eye,” imagination, and plenty of creativity. Film directors in the entertainment field use motion picture and digital video cameras to produce movies, television programs, music videos, and commercials. Those who film motion pictures are also known as cinematographers, of which some specialize in filming cartoons or special effects. Multimedia artists and animators work primarily in computer and data processing services, advertising, and the motion picture and television industries. They draw by hand as well as through computers to create the large series of pictures that form the animated images or special effects seen in movies, television programs, and computer games. Some draw storyboards for television commercials, movies, and animated features.

    Artists employed by publishing companies, advertising agencies, and design firms generally work a standard 40-hour week. During busy periods, they may work overtime to meet deadlines. Self-employed artists can set their own hours, but may spend much time and effort selling their artwork to potential customers or clients and building a reputation. Many computer software engineers interact with customers and coworkers as they try to improve software for users. Those employed by publishing, advertising, and consulting firms, may spend much of their time away from their offices or studios, frequently traveling to meet with customers and clients.

    Evidence of appropriate talent and skill, displayed in an artist’s portfolio, is an important factor used by art directors, clients, and others in deciding whether to hire or contract out work. The portfolio is a collection of hand-made, computer-generated, photographic, or printed samples of the artist’s best work. Assembling a successful portfolio requires skills usually developed in a bachelor’s degree program or other postsecondary training in art or visual communications. Internships also provide excellent opportunities for artists to develop and enhance their portfolios.
    In the year 2000, about 317,000 people were computer software engineers. Motion picture camera operators and film and video editors held about 43,000 positions. Some contracted with television networks, documentary or independent filmmakers, advertising agencies, or trade show or convention sponsors to do individual projects for a predetermined fee, often at a daily rate. Most salaried jobs were employed by television broadcasting stations or motion picture studios. Artists held about 147,000 jobs in 2000. More than half were self-employed. Of the artists who were not self-employed, many worked in motion picture, television, computer software, printing, publishing, and public relations firms. Some self-employed artists offer their services to advertising agencies, design firms, publishing houses, and other businesses.

    The job outlook for multimedia artists is considered a very rapid employment growth industry. The earnings are also great. The median annual earnings of salaried multimedia artists and animators were $41,130 (US) in 2000. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $23,740 (US), and the highest 10 percent earned more than $70,560 (US). Median annual earnings were $44,290 (US) in computer and data processing services, the industry employing the largest numbers of salaried multi-media artists and animators. Earnings for self-employed artists vary widely. Some charge only a nominal fee while they gain experience and build a reputation for their work. Others, such as well-established freelance fine artists and illustrators, can earn more than salaried artists. Like other self-employed workers, freelance artists must provide their own benefits. Median annual earnings of salaried art directors were $56,880 (US) in the year 2000 while the top 10 percent earned more than $109,440 (US). Median annual earnings were $63,510 (US) in advertising, the industry employing the largest numbers of salaried art directors.

    For more information, contact Jamie Easton

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